February Newsletter

Thursday, February 15th

On Thursday Feb 15, at 5 pm, please join us to end the work day with drinks and hors d’oeuvres in “The Doctors Are In,” a talk show-style discussion series between Duke humanities faculty and physicians. This time, surgeon Lola Fayanju and historian Laurent Dubois discuss race and postcoloniality. The parking lots on Flowers behind DGHI open to all parking permits at 5 pm: c’mon in to our Trent Hall lab.

 

For directions, visit the Health Humanities Lab website.

 

Wednesday, February 28th

Psychiatric Degeneration Theory and Irish Modernism: Blending Sickness with Sin

A Neurohumanities Research Group Lecture by Marion Quirici

5:00 pm

Perkins Library Room 217

 

Responding to patterns of industrialization and institutionalization in the nineteenth century, degeneration theorists like Benedict Morel, Cesare Lombroso, and Max Nordau became convinced that the human race was in mental and moral decline. Degeneration theory conflated mental disability with immorality and criminality, classifying vulnerable populations as dangerous deviants to justify incarceration and eugenics. In this lecture, Dr. Quirici uncovers radicalized and gendered discourses of degeneration in twentieth-century Ireland, where the Catholic Church exerted authority over life and literature alike. Fear of degeneration influenced the confinement of unwed mothers in Magdalen Laundries, the creation of the Gaelic Athletic Association, the nationalist uprising, and the decisions of the Censorship Bureau. With particular emphasis on James Joyce, who was characterized as a degenerate whose art would spread both sickness and sin, Dr. Quirici argues that resistance and critique of degeneration theory was a defining strategy of Irish modernism.

 

Visit the Health Humanities Lab website for the full flyer and more information.

March 22-23, 2018

Future Trends in Health Humanities Publishing and Pedagogy

 

March 27-30, 2018

3rd Annual Global Health Film Festival on Environmental Health in China

 

March 27-31, 2018

Duke Disability Pride Week

Thursday, March 1st

The ABCs of Medical Translation

A Lecture by Erin Lyons

10:15-11:15 am

011 Old Chem

 

The translation of medical documents is a highly complex, demanding, and regulated endeavor. Medical translators must have excellent knowledge of their working language pairs and should continuously cultivate an in-depth understanding of the cultural differences of various countries. They must also achieve mastery of medical terms and their meaning, and must possess first-rate writing skills in their working languages. Medical translators must have strong research, analysis, and reading skills and a profound knowledge of the range of medical terminology for translators and medical concepts. In addition, medical translators must be able to access appropriate reference materials and resources. Finally, they must fully understand the ethical issues and key concerns of health care.

 

Erin Lyons will speak on the basics of medical translation, in an interactive presentation designed for non-experts. She will share some of the challenges she has faced, and will incorporate examples from several languages.

 

This event is organized by Joan Munne and Melissa Simmermeyer, Lectures in the Department of Romance Studies, and has been made possible with the support of the Forum for Scholars and Publics, the Mary D.B.T. and J.H. Semans International Exchange Fund, the Trinity Language Committee, Duke Service-Learning, the Spanish Language Program, Romance Studies, Health Humanities Lab, and the Duke University Center for International Global Studies.

 

Visit sites.duke.edu/advancedspanishtranslation for more information.

Hsiao-mei Ku Performs Bright Sheng’s “The Stream Flows”

Duke Professor of the Practice of Music Hsiao-mei Ku was the violin soloist performing Bright Sheng’s “The Stream Flows,” at the “Songs of Journey” concert of the Health Humanities & Social Justice BREATH, BODY, VOICE Conference. This concert was presented in association with the Duke University Department of Music and explored themes of migration and immigration. The Health Humanities & Social Justice BREATH, BODY, VOICE Conference focused on the interdisciplinary interface between the humanities, social justice, and health, whether in the health sciences, clinical environments, or the lived experience of states of health.

 

Ciompi Quartet Performs Penka Kouneva’s “Scherzo” from String Quartet No. 1

The Ciompi Quartet performed Penka Kouneva’s “Scherzo” from String Quartet No. 1, at the “Songs of Journey” concert, the final event in the Health Humanities & Social Justice BREATH, BODY, VOICE Conference. This concert was presented in association with the Duke University Department of Music and explored themes of migration and immigration. The Health Humanities & Social Justice BREATH, BODY, VOICE Conference focused on the interdisciplinary interface between the humanities, social justice, and health, whether in the health sciences, clinical environments, or the lived experience of states of health. Duke alumna Penka Kouneva is a composer whose work has been hear widely in her scores for film, video games and the theater including games like “Prince of Persia” and a recent documentary for NASA: “Heroes and Legends.” An emigre from Bulgaria, Penka came to Duke in 1989, becoming the first graduate of Music’s Ph.D. program in composition in 1997. Stephen Jaffe’s “Migrations,” premiering at this concert, was commissioned by Kouneva for the Duke University Department of Music.

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