[Photo: Black and white image of a young East Asian person with glasses smiling and laughing, looking slightly away from the camera. Photo by Colin Pieters.]

From Collapse, Trauma, Crisis, and Ruin, We Rise: Where the Neurodiversity Movement Meets Disability Justice

A Zoom webinar featuring Lydia X. Z. Brown    Talk title: “From Collapse, Trauma, Crisis, and Ruin, We Rise: Where the Neurodiversity Movement Meets Disability Justice”   Description: Neurodivergent, crip, mad, and disabled people’s lives and communities are marked by constant trauma and the specter of violence. Our movements – the self-advocacy movement, neurodiversity movement,[…]

Running Disability Studies and Health Humanities Programs

A roundtable discussion on health humanities and disability studies programs at universities, featuring Jonathan Metzl and Aimi Hamraie (Vanderbilt), Margaret Price (Ohio State), Erin Gentry Lamb (Case Western). A discussion via Zoom. Please register with this link: http://tiny.cc/HealthHumanities Accessibility info: Captioning provided, and ASL interpretation provided upon request. This event is supported with funding from[…]

Decarcerating Disability: Deinstitutionalization and Prison Abolition by Liat Ben-Moshe - Book Talk - Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021 - 12pm-1:30pm EST - register for Zoom link - http://tiny.cc/Decarcerate *Captioning and ASL Interpretation provided* - image of concentric circles breaking open on one side - next to image of the author/speaker, Liat Ben-Moshe, a white woman smiling and sitting in a wheel chair

Decarcerating Disability: Deinstitutionalization and Prison Abolition

A talk by Dr. Liat Ben-Moshe on her new book, Decarcerating Disability: Deinstitutionalization and Prison Abolition, followed by discussion with participants.

Liat Ben-Moshe is an activist-scholar-educator-researcher working at the intersection of incarceration, decarceration, abolition and disability/madness. Her work aims to expand what counts as incarceration to include all carceral locales (including residential institutions for people with intellectual disabilities, psych facilities and prisons/jails) and to connect deinstitutionalization, disability and mad movements to prison abolition activism through an intersectional lens.

Health Humanities and COVID-19, an interview with Bryan Rusch

By: Arthi Kozhumam My life requires a lot of accommodations and advocacy and getting help, that’s just the nature of disability. In a situation like this, where I feel familiar, it’s my turn to advocate for and accommodate others. It’s about having people with you and in spirit that I think is one of the[…]